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tv   CBS Overnight News  CBS  March 1, 2016 2:07am-4:00am EST

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instant anti-aging, brououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououououou john dickerson, cbs news political director at the top of the broadcast we talked about the republican identity crisis. what's going on within the party? >> well if there was a wall between the republican party and donald trump it is 10 feet taller. in conversations with republican strategists and staffers on the hill they're at wit's end about what it would be look to have donald trump as the party nominee. what they pointed out in his
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be trying so carefully not to offend anyone and call anyone a bigot when asked about the kkk and white supremacists. suddenly he got politically correct. what they think, republicans i talked to, he was trying to not offend any southern voters. so in super tuesday, tomorrow. what house and senate leaders are worried about, what is it going to look like in the fall when they and colleagues have to respond to every in sendcendiary thing he says. they were thing how they could take the nomination away. or put a third party candidate in if he became a nominee. slip a third party candidate in there. hard to tell if they're more unsettled about being tainted by trump or the fact there is not much they can do to stop him from the nomination. >> thank you very much, john. in ohio today, a 14-year-old boy opened fire on classmates in a school cafeteria north of cincinnati. two students were shot.
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none of the injuries is life threatening. the suspect ran, but was caught nearby. there is no word yet on the motive. in virginia, the funeral is tomorrow for the prince william county police officer who was gunned down on her first day on the job. today the prosecutor said he may seek the death penalty. here is justice correspondent jeff pegues. >> reporter: 28-year-old ashley guchlt in guindon just beginning a new career as a police officer her first day in uniform would be her last. >> hold your traffic. shots have been fired. >> reporter: saturday night she and two other officers were responding to a domestic violence call at this home. as officers approached the front door they were shot. guindon rushed to the hospital. pronounced dead a few hours later. the two other officers are
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police say 32-year-old ronald hamilton opened fire on the officers with a rifle. hamilton a staff sergeant in the u.s. army is also accused of killing his wife, crystal hamilton in the home. the couple's 11-year-old son managed to run to safety. according to the army, hamilton worked in it at the pentagon joint chiefs staff center and served in iraq two years. prosecutors say hamilton had a previous run-in with the law but would not release details. prince william county prosecutor, paul ebert. >> sad, sad, sad. an example of an officer's worst nightmare. >> officer guchlt indindon in her high school yearbook wrote, live for something rather than dying for nothing. guindon, the 14th police officer killed in the line of duty so far this year. scott, 11 of 14 were killed by gunfire. a number that has risen
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same time last year. jeff pegues. thank you, jeff. turning overseas -- isis has been losing ground on the battlefield but striking back with a series of bombings in and around baghdad the past two days. more than 100 were killed. most at this park it place in a shiite neighborhood. isis is sunni. the other main faction of islam. the u.n. said today the cease-fire in syria is holding for the most part. a hotline set up by the u.s. state department for sear ynz to report violations has been ringing off the hook. the civil war left many of syria's cities in ruin. and elizabeth palmer got rare access homs, a city that once had as many residents as philadelphia. now just a fraction. >> reporter: after four years, and mega tons of explosives, the syrian army finally took back
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but several rebel units escaped into the suburb of alwar where they tried to make a last stand. in the end though the violence was too much. under siege and outgunned, the rebels caved in and agreed to talk. they're just out of sight at the end of that road. the syrian army wouldn't allow us in. but nay do allow the women out to get medical care and to shop for food. what's changed? now there are formal negotiations going on with the government they tell me. life has improved. the siege has ended. and our electricity and water are back. supplies are flowing in too, though every single box is checked by the military. and every canister of gasoline probed for hidden weapons. but now what? in december, six busload of rebels and families struck a
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alwar to opposition area farther north. that leaves about 1,000 left. stuck. still trying to hammer out the terms of their defeat. there have been several of these, call them stalemates, call them mini-truces across the country in the last couple of years, scott. they don't always go smoothly. some are more successful than others. but in the end, they all most certainly save lives. >> elizabeth palmer in the syrian capital damascus for us tonight. liz, thank you. >> off the label said 100% parmesan cheese. but it was 100% wrong. there is a new warning about a contraceptive implant used by hundreds of thousand of women. and the best of america.
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right back. if you love cheese, this news was pretty unappetizing. some parmesan contains wood pulp. then last friday an executive at
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pleaded guilty to selling cheese that had no relation to what was on the label. look. >> reporter: you would think when fda investigators found castle cheese marketing 100% parmesan cheese it was actually problem. >> the product that they were marketing which was on the label was not what they were selling. >> reporter: the u.s. attorney brought the case against the company after an fda inspection in 2012 found the parmesan was a mixture of cheaper cheeses. like swiss and cheddar. and in one case, an unknown ingredient. >> advertising it as parmesan and romano and putting something else so supplier could make more money. consumer. this was fraudulent in your view? >> yes. >> reporter: we found fraud might not be the worst of it. these fda record show finished
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unrefrigerated room which could cause back tear yer bacteria to thrive. the company found listeria in its production area ten times. but castle continued to produce and sell its cheese to stores like target and wal-mart without testing it. that might be troubling enough. if we didn't also find record from the pennsylvania department of agriculture which inspected castle around the same time as the fda. those record tell a very different story. in june of 2012, state inspector david trotter wrote-- the plant continues to be in excellent condition. i appreciate the plant management and the quality work they do. his glowing reviews continued until august 2013 when he left the department of agriculture for a new job. director of quality control at castle cheese. >> i'm with cbs news. we asked trotter to explain
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declined. castle cheese is no longer on the market. the company filed for bankruptcy in 2014. the fda will be rolling out new food safety regulations, the fda tells us designed to get state and federal inspectors on the same page. >> jim, thank you very much. well, chris rocked the oscars last night.
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him? >> if they nominated a host. i wouldn't even get this job. so you would be watching neil patrick harris right now. >> chris rock roasted the oscars last night on the issue of diversity. all of t t acting nominees were white. and rock pointed out that's happened many times in the past 88 years. neilson says the 34 million oscar viewers were the fewest in eight years. george kennedy won an oscar in 1968 for his role in "cool hand luke" and fikts chur inxture in all four airplane movies and showed off his comedic side in the naked gun.
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he was 91. the fda is iesh ugh the strongest warning abut assure, an implaktable permanent contraceptive device used by 750,000 women. some come plaend of chronic pain and bleeding. the fda ordered the manufacturer, bayer to conduct a safety study and stopped short
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market today president obama presented the medal of honor to a 36-year-old navy seal from ohio. david martin has his story. to call edward buyers a combat veteran doesn't come close. reading your uniform correctly. five bronze stars, two purple hearts. >> correct. >> how many combat tours have you done? >> i have none nine combat tours. >> in 2012, member of seal team
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kidnapped by the taliban. as they approached the building the point man saw they had been detected. >> he saw a guard come out of the door. he shot him. and we started sprinting toward the door. >> nicholas czech went in first. he was shot and died. >> second personin. entered into the room. i saw another enemy standing there with a weapon. i shot him. i saw a person moving across the floor. didn't know whether or not that person was the american hostage or, if he was an enemy. so i moved down toward him. and i was able to get on top of him. when he heard dr. joseph call out from another part of the room. that's when high shot the person i was on top of. jumped off him. and on to the doctor, three or five feet away. >> why did you jump on the doctor? >> we did that. we are in body arm ore. want to protect him from any other potential threats. when i did that. i realized there was an enemy within arm's reach.
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and so i was able to -- hold him against the wall, by grabbing him around the throat. and that was, gave enough time for our teammates to get in there and to take care of that threat. >> when you say take care of the threat? how did that work? >> our teammates came around and, they shot him. >> reporter: you were holding him by the throat against the wall? >> correct. yes. >> reporter: when it was over. five taliban. one navy seal, nicholas checque laid dead or dying. the doctor was shaken but alive. how long did this >> took a minute to go in and take care of all we talked about. >> reporter: a lot of action going on in a very confined space. >> that's the nature of this job. close quarters combat. >> reporter: takes longer to tell it than it did to happen? >> yes, it does. >> reporter: now a medal of honor to go with five bronze stars and two purple hearts.
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other minutes of close quarters combat edward buyers saw in his nine combat tours. one thing for sure, he will never tell. david martin, cbs news, washington. that's the "cbs overnight news" for this tuesday. for some of you, the news continues. for others, check back with us a little bit later for the morning news. and, cbs this morning. from the broadcast center in new york city. i'm scott pelley. >> announcer: this is the "cbs overnight news." hi. welcome to the overnight news. i'm demarco morgan. super tuesday, the biggest day of the nominating season. a dozen states holding primaries or caucuses that will go a long way determining who heads the major party tickets in november. cbs news battleground tracker those hillary clinton and donald trump holding commanding leads in most super tuesday states. for trump the news is even better.
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the choice of half the voters who said they're likely to vote republican. ted cruz and marco rubio are way back. scrambling to stop the trump steamroller. major garrett reports. >> reporter: better or worse, marco rubio discovered his inner donald trump. the instinct to hurl insults. grab attention see what happens. it is a successful model. for trump one potential downside it obscures a more important conversation about trump. republican party. >> he doesn't sweat his pores are clogged from the spray tan. marco rubio got more personal in trump. he is calling me, little marco. he is taller. 6'2", which is why i don't understand his hand are the size of some one, 5'2." have you seen his hands? you know what they say about men with small hands? you can't trust them.
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>> reporter: this weekend the gop front-runner continued his own attacks on rubio pointing to his performance in the february 6th debate. >> so i am looking at little marco. i say man there is something happening with him.- he is like melting. >> reporter: trump campaigned and face nuded new questions about making space for white supremacists. in the past trump retweeted messages from white supremacists and from world war ii, fascist dictator benito mussolini. and over the weekend hesitated when asked about david duke's endorsement and hate groups generally. >> i know nothing abut david duke or white supremacists. i don't know what group you are talking about. you wouldn't want me to condemn the group i know nothing about. >> i didn't know he endorsed me. david duke endorsed me. okay. all right. i disavow. okay. rivals were quick to pounce.
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waffling dangerous to the gop. >> how are we going to grow our party with a nominee -- >> john kasich said trump must explain. >> donald trump refused to disassociate himself and condemn white supremacists. every day it is another thing. >> ted cruz took to twitter. >> we should all agree, racism is wrong. kkk is abhorrent. trump also picked up the endorsement of alabama senator jeff sessions in what can be interpret to a blow to cruz. cruz invoked sessions name in the fight against rubio and comprehensive immigration reform. as for the democrats hillary clinton is carrying serious momentum into today's vote. the latest cbs news battleground tracker shows clinton has a big lead in three key supertuesday states. georgia, virginia, and texas. and she still riding the wave from decisive win over bernie sanders in saturday's south
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nancy cordes on the cam pran trail in fairfax, virginia. >> poll numbers help explain why increasingly clinton is turning atention away from bernie sanders, training her fire instead on the republican candidates. >> i want to debate who ever they put up. because here's what they're saying. they're selling the same snake oil. trickle down economics. >> clinton changed focus after her south carolina blowout. >> tomorrow this campaign goes national. she won the african-american vote by 72 points. on face the nation, sanders didn't sugarcoat it. >> we did really, really badly with older african-american voters. i mean we got decimated. >> reporter: he must compete in seven more southern states. latest cbs news battleground tracker shows him trailing clinton by 24 points in texas and 28 points in georgia. voter there said clinton is
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but they viewed sanders as more principled and honest. >> secretary clinton does it, a little bit differently. >> a distinction he tried to draw in oklahoma city. >> if you are going to get paid $200,000 for a speech. must be a pretty damn good speech. if it is a such a good speech, you got to release the transcripts. let everybody see it. >> reporter: clinton campaigned in nashville with scandal actor tony goldwyn. a camera caught the candidate reaction when he told her about the latest trump controversy. >> kkk, he didn't know who david dukes was? >> oh, that's pa thet tick. >> sanders shared that sentiment. tweeting, america's first black president cannot and will not be succeeded by a hate monger who refuses to condemn the kkk. clinton retweeted it. >> some supporters say we like mr. trump because he tells it like it is.
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it is. even as clinton pulls ahead in the delegate count, he is poised to notch his best fund-raising month ever. pulling in $36 million in february. the irs says a massive data breach may have compromised the tax information and social security numbers to more than 700,000 filers. thieves hacked into the get transfer program which lets you check your tax information online. jan crawford reports. >> somebody was trying to claim a refund using my social security number. i knew something was wrong. not even virginia tax attorney wayne zell was protected from hammers who he says stole his identity. >> i got a form earlier this week, stating that somebody had recovered my e-file personal identification number. i don't have an e-file personal identification number. >> reporter: the irs data dump the latest in a series of disclosures.
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cybercriminals accessed some 114,000 taxpayer accounts. three months later, the number grew to 334,000. this month the irs says as many as 724,000 victims. >> the irs is frankly not doing enough to protect us. steve weissman is an expert in identity theft. >> the fact it takes them so many months to even analyze the depth of the problem shows you that there probably are even more identity theft that is going on. >> reporter: the irs says hackers used personal information gathered from other online sources like bank accounts, to answer personal identity questions on the get transcript forms. one possible culprit. irs approved tax preparesers. one audit found 6 of 13 irs approved companies failed at providing adequate security to customers. >> we are often our own worst enemies. there are times that we don't
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we don't use proper security. >> reporter: the irs is notifying the hacked taxpayers by mail as well as offering free identity protection for a year. in a statement, the agency says, it is committed to protecting taxpayers on multiple fronts against tax related i department tee theft. we are moving quickly to help these taxpayers. >> the "cbs overnight news" will be right back. did you know there's a cough liquid that lasts for twelve hours? try delsym twelve hour cough liquid. its advanced formula releases powerful medicine that acts fast while its extended release medicine lasts for 12 hours. try delsym . degree gave women a motion-activated wristband to understand how much they move,...
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if you missed the academy awards the other night. alicia viklander, leo dicaprio won the oscars. the host, chris rock. jumped into the controversy over the lack of black nominees. kevin frasier reports. >> will i am here at the academy awards. otherwise known as the white
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>> reporter: chris rock wasted no time sunday night. jabs at academy's lack of racial diversity were expected from the moment the nominations were announced when it was revealed that all 20 nominated actors were white. >> you realize if they nominated hosts i wouldn't even get this job. rock kept the jokes coming, even out of the commercial break. >> oh, we're black. >> the broadcast politically charged atmosphere included more than just diversity issue. dim. caprio took home the oscar for best actor and took the opportunity to deliver a message about the environment. a passion of his more than a decade. >> climate change is real. it is happening right now. it is the most urgent threat facing our entire species. >> i'm the least qualified man here tonight. thank you. >> vice president joe biden walked on stage to a standing ovation and talked of speaking out against sexual abuse.
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part of his introduction to lady gaga's song "till it happens to you." till it happens to you you won't know how i feel >> reporter: as the song ended victims of abuse filled the stage. eat motional response from the audience was clear. brie larson hugged each person as they came off stage. >> and the oscar goes to -- >> "spotlight." >> reporter: the top honor went to a film with the strongest political message. spotlight tells the true story of journalists at the "boston globe" who investigated the catholic church's cover-up of molestation by the city's priests. >> this film gave a voice to survivors. and this oscar amplifies that voice which we hope will become a choir that will resonate all
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>> reporter: the first time a director won back to back oscars in 66 years. the biggest upset. a bridge of spies, not sylvester stallone won best supporting actor. best supporting actress, alicia vikander. mad max fury road, six oscars. real star of the show was chris rock. felt he hit it out of the ballpark. at the museum of modern art in new york city, film technicians earned an oscar of their own. they find and preserve classic films some 100 years old. anthony mason reports. >> reporter: the film archives of the museum of modern art curators are trying to restore a silent film classic. >> if you look closely you can't see it now. but you can see it is very scratched. >> reporter: the 1923 film, "rosita" stars mary bigford, one of america's first film icons. >> this is the only surviving
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>> yes. >> katie trainer manages the collection. >> this print was 4 k scanned at a lab. and now they're in the process of going through it like, literallying, frame by frame. moma's film archive is the oldest in the world. >> our little guy. >> reporter: so influential. in 1977, the academy honored the museum for pioneering work. >> this is our oscar. >> nice. >> museum of modern art, department of film. >> specifically for our work in film preservation. >> raj roy says as moma's library expanded it outgrew the museum's new york city location. this sprawling storage facility was built in hamlin, pennsylvania. >> cold in here. >> very cold, yeah, all the belter tobelt better to keep these. at this temperature, 35 degrees. relatively dry. we can keep these almost 400 years.
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more than 50 storage vaults. for 25,000 titles. everything from experimental films to classics like "birth of a nation" and "grapes of wrath" and "the third man." >> a film called citizen kanee on any many reels. keep them flat. dry. cold. having the analog storage version. the best thing. lets me sleep at night. knowing we have this. >> old posters? >> posters, ephemera. >> moma also archives those. >> these are all from the atlanta premiere of gone with the wind. >> reporter: like the studio scrapbook of press clippings from "gone with the wind's" 1939 premiere which includes a page on the black actors in the film. awe moma's work of r rtoring
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it will bring back a major mary pickford film also the first am can movie by legender edagerman director, ernst lubich. head of film preservation at moma. >> how does the film like that disappear? >> mary apparently took a personal dislike to it. for reasons that are still not completely clear. it seems she deliberately allowed the film to deteriorate. didn't renew the copy right on the film. >> the museum discovered a copy in the soviet union in the 1970s. >> in horrible condition. just too much for the technology of the time to handle. >> reporter: now rosita's time has the finally come. and kerr wishes more films could be restored to the quality of douglas fairbank's final movie, "the iron mask" made in 1929. >> this is a copy made directly from the original camera
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actual film passed through the camera on the sets. >> reporter: even showing the films will become challenging. 35 millimeter projectors are no longer manufactured. and spare parts will keep projectors going only for another decade. >> but after that. we have to start dijgitizing this massive collection, a huge understaking. make is my head explode. >> you feel like you are in a race? >> it is getting there. don't think the seriousness of this has settled in, even in the archival. >> movies are what america did best in the 20th century. that's our defining art form. i don't want to lose one frame of that stuff. i really don't. an expensive septic disaster. but for only $7 a month, rid-x helps break down waste. avoid a septic disaster with rid-x.
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in just one click, even keep your toilet clean and fresh. introducing lysol click gel. click it in to enjoy clean freshness with every flush. lysol. start healthing. yeah, click yesterday was leap day. if you missed it you are not alone. february 29th comes around one every four years. most of the time. jamie wax has the confusing story of the extra day. >> every four years we have to squeeze an extra day into february. except we don't add an extra day every four years if that year is evenly divisible by 100 and also divisible by 400. if that sound confusing, it is. we decided to dig into what leap years are all about. started with one special leap
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>> daisy bell ward appeared in sun day's finest for her birthday party this weekend. >> isn't she beautiful? >> she was born on february 29, 1916, making her america's oldest living leap baby. >> amazing. >> you made it. >> yeah. >> reporter: the bash complete with an 80-piece marching band was celebration of her 100 years. according to the calendar her 25th birthday. daisy seemed to embrace the latter. why does daisy's birthday only come around once every four years? do you know why we have a leap year? >> no. >> no. >> probably something about the sun. >> the seasons and, global warming. >> i don't know. >> el nino. >> reporter: we decided might be best to consult an expert.
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why do we need a leap year? >> mother nature has a sense of humor. did not make a calendar when you go around the son. 365 days. what we learn in school. no, mother nature made it so every 365 days plus 5:49 and few odd seconds. that means that every year we have to compensate for one quarter of a day. after four years we have to add one more day. so when did we figure out the need for this extra day it? was bay back in 46 bc. julius caesar realized the calendar wasn't working. consulted with an astronomer. they realized what the egyptians discover. we need an extra day every four years to stay on track. he in to theed the julian calendar. even that wasn't quite right.
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.242 longer, not even .25. when we add a full day every four years we are left with surplus of 11 minutes every year. that can start to add up. finally in 1582, pope gregory 17th. instituted the gregorian calendar we follow today. how is it different? i will let michio kaku explain. >> 11 minutes difference in one year, builds up. the pope had to intervene the calendar one more time. so for example in the year 1600. divisible by 400. a leap year. in 1700. 1800. 1900. no lope year. year 2000 there was again a leap year. >> lot of tweaking. >> that's right. >> luck we he have digital watches to keep track. it turns out, accounting for
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traditional watches. >> this watch has a wheel that turns one revolution every four years to accommodate the extra day. >> some body engineer a wheel. >> many of us have to adjust the gauges, end of february. protect the leap, perpetual calendar does that for you. >> to see how it works. we looked at one under a microscope. >> it is a cycle of 48 months for the leap year. we have a 48. 48 lobes. each lobe represents a month. >> reporter: it take is a year and a half to construct one watch. it will set you back around $85,000. you have four years to save up for the next leap year. around the world, leap year traditions vary. in greece, it's bad luck to get married any day of the leap year. up north. february 29th.
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marriage to a man. for daisy, her birthday tradition has always been a nice dinner with family and friend. but this year was different. after all, it's not every day you turn 25. one last thing to think about this leap year morning. if you've haven't left for work. consider just saying home.
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tt0w!tx#hi!!%4@-*! tt0w!tx#hi!!el@- &l tt0w!tx#hi!!ed@-&$( tt0w!tx#hi%!)8h-fzt tt0w!tx#hi%!kzh-[5( tt0w!tx#hi%!n-h-.\$ tt0w!tx#hi%!0ph-0;< tt0w!tx#hi%!s"h- i\ tt0w!tx#hi%!ueh-#+, tt0w!tx#hi%!7hh-?)x you could have seen this one coming a mile away. google says it is partially responsible for the crash of one of its driverless cars. last month in mountain view. a driverless lexus tried to maneuver sandbags and side swiped a bus when it reentered its lane. no one was hurt. damage was minimal. peter greenberg got a look at the state of the technology. >> reporter: to see where driver's cars are heading.
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professor raj kumara at carnegie university, where the technology was created over 30 years age for all the people telling us we are going to be driving, driverless car tomorrow, you say? >> just wait. the magic all happens in here. >> reporter: right. keep waiting. because despite all the technology and decades of research, the driverless car has a long way to go. >> the biggest nightmare that people like me who work on the car is that somebody dough ploiz this technology prematurely and child dies. >> reporter: as disturbing as unlikely, a scenario on the mind of researchers and slowing momentum of autonomous vehicles. >> we as human beings are much less tolerant of an error a machine makes. >> gill pratt heads the research
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global initiative from the manufacture the driverless car. >> how do you program decisions into the driverless car? >> what you are really talking about in artificial intelligence is called planning. >> planning for near in fi that number of ethical scenarios like this. suppose your car is approaching a head-on collision. to avoid the vehicle, your car can move right because crossing the yellow line on the left is illegal. what is there is a person. or group of people to your right? >> these machines have ability to understand what is happening in the world much better than a human can. >> every time? >> the leading tow yo ta research at mit. >> whatever time it is reasonable. self driving can be used to day. and used at low speeds perhaps where we don't about whether there is catastrophic collision.
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melon, our driverless car takes a detour. >> decided to take over. >> yes, the system has been sitting quite some time. >> professor raj kumar takes the wheel. evidence of the autonomous vehicle has miles to go. that the "cbs overnight news." for some the news continues. for others check back with morning news. and krscbs this morning. from the broadcast center in new york city. i'm demarco moore. on the eve of super tuesday, trump clashes with black lives matters protesters. >>get them out. get them out. out. out. out. out. >> also tonight, a cop is gunned down on her first day on the job. the big cheese at a food company pleads guilty to selling parmesan that had no parmesan. and david martin with an american hero. >> that's five bronze stars, two purple hearts. >> that's correct.
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>> announcer: this is the "cbs overnight news." no candidate will clinch the nomination today, but super tuesday may generate irreversible momentum for hillary clinton and donald trump. they're favored in most of the 12 state primaries and caucuses. for democrats, a step towards certainty. for republicans, another jolt in the party's identity crisis. polls show trump leading in at least six states. he is trailing ted cruz in cruz's home state of texas. the republican race, petty, profane and unprecedented now has prominent republicans talking of an independent candidate if trump wins the nomination. race became the weapon of choice today. major garrett is with the republicans. >> reporter: following the news that former kkk leader david duke was supporting donald trump, black lives matters protesters interrupted a trump
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a "time" magazine photographer tried to leave the press area to shoot the protesters as escorted from the venue. he was thrown to the ground by a secret service agent. photographer chris morris admitted to cursing at the agent before the confrontation became physical. morris said the agent grabbed him by the neck and put him in a chokehold. >> i am dealing with some real sleaze bags up here. believe me. i think the press is worse, i'm telling you. they're worse than the politicians. trump makes a sport of criticizing reporters and makes it clear protesters are unwelcome. >> out. get out. out. >> trump's momentum towards the gop nomination brought a sharper edge to his already raucous rallies. marco rubio complained that gutter rhetoric makes headlines. >> what an indictment on the state of political debate in the country today. >> reporter: yesterday, rubio
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>> you know what they say about men with small hands. you can't trust them. you can't trust them. >> reporter: rubio is hoping for strong enough finishes tomorrow to stay competitive in the delegate count. ted cruz is banking on a victory in his home state of texas. >> and we are i believe going to have a big chunk of delegates. i think everyone else will be way, way, way behind. at that point it will become abundantly clear this is a two man race. >> reporter: secret service interviewed the agent involved in the altercation at the trump rally. agency policy to protect the candidate. the photographer involved, chris rris said he will not press arges. >> specially not after the way he provoked the agent. major garrett reporting for us. major, thank you. all of this followed trump's responses to support he is getting wanted or not from the ku klux klan to. day, mitt romney said trump has been disqualified. here is dean reynolds. >> reporter: campaigning in
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boasting again. >> we have amazing endorsements, people that really mean, we have hundreds of people now that want to endorse. >> reporter: praise from david duke, former grand wizard of the ku klux klan may test his following more than ever. voting against donald trump at this point is treason to your heritage. >> reporter: last friday, trump seemed to say no thanks. >> i disavow. >> sunday he declined to renounce the k.k.k., duke or his support. >> i don't know anything about david duke, okay. i don't know anything about what you are talking about with white supremacy or supremacists. i don't know. trump tried to clear up any confusion. >> i disavowed david duke all week long on facebook on twitter. said a bad earpiece made it hard to hear the question about the kkk sunday though he used the same one for several interviews. in any case it is clear some far right groups like what they're hearing from him.
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neo-nazi website, daily stormer for example and american national super pac is making calls in super tuesday states. >> we don't need muslims. we need smart, well educated white people to assimilate to our culture. vote trump. >> reporter: southern poverty law center which tracks hate groups says the super pac was started by white supremacist american freedom party, trump's rhetoric is a coded appeal to racists. >> the idea that any mildly educated person in this country could not know what the ku klux klan was is perhaps one of the most ludicrous statements we have heard in mainstream politics in many years. >> reporter: the super pac backing marco rubio put it this way. >> trump refuses to denounce the kkk.
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>> donald trump has been heavily criticized before, scott, and so far, his support for the nomination among voters in the party of abraham lincoln has held firm. >> dean reynolds reporting for us tonight. thank you. >> the polls are pointing for a very good super tuesday for hillary clinton. here is nancy cordes. >> thank you. >> reporter: clinton said the republican candidates were behaving like grade schoolers. >> remember the little box that used to be on your kids' report cards. play well with others. i would have to put a big no. >> reporter: she is poised to make the dean's list tomorrow. the latest cbs news battleground tracker shows clinton leading sanders by 20 points in virginia, 24 points in texas and 2 points in georgia. other polls have her up in tennessee, alabama, and
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of arkansas. that leaves sanders hoping for a strong showing in oklahoma. colorado. minnesota. and his home state of vermont. >> we can win. no question here in minnesota. if we have a turnout. the two have found common cause in their distaste for donald trump. when sanders called trump a hate mongor online, clinton retweeted it. but otherwise she has begun to focus less on him and more on her likely race against the republicans. >> one advantage i have is they have been after me for 25 years and i'm still standing. >> reporter: the state department is releasing its final batch of clinton's 30,000 e-mails tonight. but, scott, that does not mean the saga is over. the fbi is still looking into her use of a private server and
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her top aide to testify about . nancy cordes with the mocrats. ank you. e "cbs overnight news" will be ght back. john dickerson, cbs news political director at the top of the broadcast we talked about the republican identity crisis. what's going on within the party? >> well if there was a wall between the republican party and donald trump it is 10 feet taller. in conversations with republican strategists and staffers on the
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what it would be look to have donald trump as the party nominee. what they pointed out in his interview is that he seemed to be trying so carefully not to offend anyone and call anyone a bigot when asked about the kkk and white supremacists. suddenly he got politically correct. what they think, republicans i talked to, he was trying to not offend any southern voters. so in super tuesday, tomorrow. what house and senate leaders are worried about, what is it going to look like in the fall when they and colleagues have to respond to every incendiary thing he says. they were thing how they could take the nomination away. or put a third party candidate in if he became a nominee. slip a third party candidate in there. hard to tell if they're more unsettled about being tainted by ump or the fact there is not ch they can do to stop him from the nomination. >> thank you very much, john. in ohio today, a 14-year-old boy opened fire on classmates in a school cafeteria north of cincinnati.
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two others were hit by shrapnel. none of the injuries is life threatening. the suspect ran, but was caught nearby. there is no word yet on the motive. in virginia, the funeral is tomorrow for the prince william county police officer who was gunned down on her first day on the job. today the prosecutor said he may seek the death penalty. here is justice correspondent jeff pegues. >> reporter: 28-year-old ashley guindon, a decorated marine corps reservist, was just beginning a new career as a police officer her first day in uniform would be her last. >> hold your traffic. shots have been fired. >> reporter: saturday night she and two other officers were responding to a domestic violence call at this home. as officers approached the front door they were shot. guindon rushed to the hospital. pronounced dead a few hours
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the two other officers are expected to survive. police say 32-year-old ronald hamilton opened fire on the officers with a rifle. hamilton a staff sergeant in the u.s. army is also accused of killing his wife, crystal hamilton in the home. the couple's 11-year-old son managed to run to safety. according to the army, hamilton worked in it at the pentagon joint chiefs staff center and served in iraq two years. prosecutors say hamilton had a previous run-in with the law but would not release details. prince william county prosecutor, paul ebert. >> sad, sad, sad. an example of an officer's worst nightmare. >> officer guindon in her high school yearbook wrote, live for something rather than dying for nothing. guindon, the 14th police officer killed in the line of duty so far this year. scott, 11 of 14 were killed by gunfire. a number that has risen
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jeff pegues. thank you, jeff. turning overseas -- isis has been losing ground on the battlefield but striking back with a series of bombings in and around baghdad the past two days. more than 100 were killed. most at this marketplace in a shiite neighborhood. isis is sunni. the other main faction of islam. the u.n. said today the cease-fire in syria is holding for the most part. a hotline set up by the u.s. state department for syrians to report violations has been ringing off the hook. the civil war left many of syria's cities in ruin. and elizabeth palmer got rare access homs, a city that once had as many residents as philadelphia. now just a fraction. >> reporter: after four years, and mega tons of explosives, the syrian army finally took back the city of homs from opposition
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but several rebel units escaped into the suburb of alwar where they tried to make a last stand. in the end though the violence was too much. under siege and outgunned, the rebels caved in and agreed to talk. they're just out of sight at the end of that road. the syrian army wouldn't allow us in. but nay do allow the women out to get medical care and to shop for food. what's changed? now there are formal negotiations going on with the government they tell me. life has improved. the siege has ended. and our electricity and water are back. supplies are flowing in too, though every single box is checked by the military. and every canister of gasoline probed for hidden weapons. but now what? in december, six busload of rebels and families struck a deal for safe passage out of
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that leaves about 1,000 left. stuck. still trying to hammer out the terms of their defeat. there have been several of these, call them stalemates, call them mini-truces across the country in the last couple of years, scott. they don't always go smoothly. some are more successful than others. but in the end, they all most certainly save lives. >> elizabeth palmer in the syrian capital damascus for us tonight. liz, thank you. >> off the label said 100% parmesan cheese. but it was 100% wrong. there is a new warning about a contraceptive implant used by hundreds of thousand of women. and the best of america. awarded the medal of honor.
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this is mineral build up it collects leaving gross germ-ridden stains. clorox toilet bowl eaner with bleach is no match for that. but lysol power toilet bowl cleaner eliminates mineral build-up effortlessly. so why choose anything other than lysol? enough pressure in here for ya? i'm gonna take mucinex sinus-max. too late, we're about to take off. these dissolve fast. they're new liquid gels.
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you realize i have gold status? mucinex sinus-max liquid gels. dissolves fast to unleash max strength medicine. let's end this. if you love cheese, this news was pretty unappetizing. some parmesan contains wood pulp.
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a pennsylvania food company pleaded guilty to selling cheese that had no relation to what was on the label. we asked jim axelrod to take a look. >> reporter: you would think when fda investigators found castle cheese marketing 100% parmesan cheese it was actually 0% parmesan the company had a problem. the product that they were rketing which was on the label was not what they were selling. reporter: the u.s. attorney brought the case against the company after an fda inspection in 2012 found the parmesan was a mixture of cheaper cheeses. like swiss and cheddar. and in one case, an unknown ingredient. >> advertising it as parmesan and romano and putting something else so supplier could make more
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that's clearly fraud on the consumer. this was fraudulent in your view? >> yes. >> reporter: we found fraud might not be the worst of it. these fda record show finished cheese was stored in the unrefrigerated room which could cause bacteria to thrive. the company found listeria in its production area ten times. but castle continued to produce and sell its cheese to stores like target and wal-mart without testing it. that might be troubling enough. if we didn't also find record from the pennsylvania department of agriculture which inspected castle around the same time as the fda. those record tell a very different story. in june of 2012, state inspector david trotter wrote-- the plant continues to be in excellent condition. i appreciate the plant management and the quality work they do. his glowing reviews continued until august 2013 when he left the department of agriculture for a new job. director of quality control at castle cheese. >> i'm with cbs news. we asked trotter to explain reviews of castle but he declined. castle cheese is no longer on
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the company filed for bankruptcy in 2014. the fda will be rolling out new food safety regulations, the fda tells us designed to get state and federal inspectors on the same page. >> jim, thank you very much. well, chris rocked the oscars last night.
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him? >> if they nominated a host. i wouldn't even get this job. so you would be watching neil patrick harris right now. >> chris rock roasted the oscars last night on the issue of diversity. all of the acting nominees were white. and rock pointed out that's happened many times in the past 88 years. neilson says the 34 million oscar viewers were the fewest in eight years. george kennedy won an oscar in 1968 for his role in "cool hand luke" and fixture in all four airplane movies and showed off his comedic side in the naked gun. george kennedy died yesterday.
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today, the fda said it is issuing its strongest warning about essure, an implantable permanent contraceptive device used by 750,000 women. some have complained of chronic pain and bleeding. the fda ordered the manufacturer, bayer to conduct a safety study and stopped short of removing the device from the market.
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right back. today president obama presented the medal of honor to a 36-year-old navy seal from ohio. david martin has his story. to call edward buyers a combat veteran doesn't come close. ading your uniform correctly. ve bronze stars, two purple arts. correct. how many combat tours have u done? i have none nine combat urs. in 2012, member of seal team he was sent to rescue a man dnapped by the taliban.
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the point man saw they had been detected. >> he saw a guard come out of the door. he shot him. and we started sprinting toward the door. >> reporter: the pointman, nicholas checque, went in first. he was shot and died. >> second person in. entered into the room. i saw another enemy standing there with a weapon. i shot him. i saw a person moving across the floor. didn't know whether or not that person was the american hostage or, if he was an enemy. so i moved down toward him. and i was able to get on top of him. when he heard dr. joseph call out from another part of the room. that's when i shot the person i was on top. jumped off him. and on to the doctor, three or five feet away. >> why did you jump on the doctor? >> we did that. we are in body arm ore. want to protect him from any other potential threats.
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i realized there was an enemy within arm's reach. of where we are laying. and so i was able to -- hold him against the wall, by grabbing him around the throat. and that was, gave enough time for our teammates to get in there and to take care of that threat. >> when you say take care of the threat? how did that work? >> our teammates came around and, they shot him. >> reporter: you were holding him by the throat against the wall? >> correct. yes. reporter: when it was over. ve taliban. e navy seal, nicholas checque id dead or dying. e doctor was shaken but alive. w long did this lastst took a minute to go in and take care of all we talked about. >> reporter: a lot of action going on in a very confined space. >> that's the nature of this job. close quarters combat. >> reporter: takes longer to
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>> yes, it does. >> reporter: now a medal of honor to go with five bronze stars and two purple hearts. you have to wonder how many other minutes of close quarters combat edward buyers saw in his nine combat tours. one thing for sure, he will never tell. david martin, cbs news, washington. that's the "cbs overnight news" for this tuesday. for some of you, the news continues. for others, check back with us a little bit later for the morning news. and, cbs this morning. from the broadcast center in new york city. m scott pelley. >> announcer: this is the "cbs overnight news." hi. welcome to the overnight news. i'm demarco morgan. it is super tuesday, the biggest day of the nominating season. a dozen states holding primaries or caucuses that will go a long way determining who heads the major party tickets in november. cbs news battleground tracker shows front-runners, hillary clinton and donald trump holding commanding leads in most super tuesday states. for trump the news is even better. a new national poll shows he is
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who said they're likely to vote republican. ted cruz and marco rubio are way back. scrambling to stop the trump steamroller. major garrett reports. >> reporter: better or worse, marco rubio discovered his inner donald trump. the instinct to hurl insults. grab attention see what happens. it is a successful model. for trump one potential downside it obscures a more important conversation about trump. tolerance and the future of the republican party. >> he doesn't sweat his pores are clogged from the spray tan. marco rubio got more personal in his attacks against donald trump. he is calling me, little marco. he is taller. 6'2", which is why i don't understand his hand are the size of some one, 5'2." have you seen his hands? you know what they say about men
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you can't trust them. >> reporter: this weekend the gop front-runner continued his own attacks on rubio pointing to his performance in the february 6th debate. >> so i am looking at little marco. i say man there is something happening with him. he is like melting. >> reporter: trump campaigned and faced new questions about making space for white supremacists. in the past trump retweeted messages from white supremacists and retweet aid quote over the weekend from world war ii, fascist dictator benito mussolini. sunday, trump hesitated when asked about the former ku klux klan david duke's endorsement and hate groups generally. >> i know nothing abut david duke or white supremacists. i don't know what group you are talking about. you wouldn't want me to condemn the group i know nothing about. >> reporter: trump knew enough about duke to say this friday in fort worth. >> i didn't know he endorsed me. david duke endorsed me. okay. all right. i disavow. okay. rivals were quick to pounce. marco rubio called trump's waffling dangerous to the gop.
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party with a nominee -- that refuses to condemn the ku klux klan. >> in massachusetts, john kasich said trump must explain. >> donald trump refused to disassociate himself and condemn white supremacists. every day it is another thing. >> ted cruz took to twitter. >> we should all agree, racism is wrong. kkk is abhorrent. trump also picked up the endorsement of alabama senator jeff sessions in what can be interpret to a blow to cruz. cruz invoked sessions name in the fight against rubio and comprehensive immigration reform. as for the democrats hillary clinton is carrying serious momentum into today's vote. the latest cbs news battleground tracker shows clinton has a big lead in three key supertuesday states. georgia, virginia, and texas. and she still riding the wave from decisive win over bernie sanders in saturday's south
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nancy cordes is on the campaign trail in fairfax, virginia. >> poll numbers help explain why increasingly clinton is turning atention away from bernie sanders, training her fire instead on the republican candidates. >> i want to debate who ever they put up. because here's what they're saying. they're selling the same snake oil. trickle down economics. >> clinton changed focus after her south carolina blowout. >> tomorrow this campaign goes national. she won the african-american vote by 72 points. on face the nation, sanders didn't sugarcoat it. >> we did really, really badly with older african-american voters. i mean we got decimated. >> reporter: he must compete in seven more southern states. latest cbs news battleground
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clinton by 24 points in texas and 28 points in georgia. voters there said clinton is more qualified. but they viewed sanders as more principled and honest. >> secretary clinton does it, a little bit differently. >> a distinction he tried to draw in oklahoma city. >> if you are going to get paid $200,000 for a speech. must be a pretty damn good speech. if it is a such a good speech, you got to release the transcripts. let everybody see it. >> reporter: clinton campaigned in nashville with scandal actor tony goldwyn. a camera caught the candidate reaction when he told her about the latest trump controversy. >> kkk, he didn't know who david dukes was? >> oreck, that's pathetic. >> sanders shared that sentiment. tweeting, america's first black president cannot and will not be succeeded by a hate monger who refuses to condemn the kkk. clinton retweeted it. >> some supporters say we like mr. trump because he tells it like it is.
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it is. even as clinton pulls ahead in the delegate count, he is poised to notch his best fund-raising month ever. pulling in $36 million in february. the irs says a massive data breach may have compromised the tax information and social security numbers to more than 700,000 filers. thieves hacked into the get transfer program which lets you check your tax information online. jan crawford reports. >> somebody was trying to claim a refund using my social security number. i knew something was wrong. not even virginia tax attorney wayne zell was protected from hackers who he says stole his identity. >> i got a form earlier this week, stating that somebody had recovered my e-file personal identification number. i don't have an e-file personal identification number. >> reporter: the irs data dump the latest in a series of disclosures.
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cybercriminals accessed some 114,000 taxpayer accounts. three months later, the number grew to 334,000. this month the irs says as many as 724,000 victims. >> the irs is frankly not doing enough to protect us. steve weissman is an expert in identity theft. >> the fact it takes them so many months to even analyze the depth of the problem shows you at there probably are even more identity theft that is going on. >> reporter: the irs says hackers used personal information gathered from other online sources like bank accounts, to answer personal identity questions on the get transcript forms. one possible culprit. irs approved tax preparesers. one audit found 6 of 13 irs approved companies failed at providing adequate security to customers. >> we are often our own worst
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there are times that we don't use proper pass words. we don't use proper security. >> reporter: the irs is notifying the hacked taxpayers by mail as well as offering free identity protection for a year. in a statement, the agency says, it is committed to protecting taxpayers on multiple fronts against tax-related identity theft. we are moving quickly to help these taxpayers. >> the "cbs overnight news" will be right back.e,... and created degree with motionsense. the world's first antiperspirant activated by movement, it has unique microcapsules that break with friction to release bursts of freshness all day. keeping you fresher with every move. motionsense. protection to keep you moving.
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kevin frasier reports. >> will i am here at the academy awards. otherwise known as the white people's choice awards. >> reporter: chris rock wasted no time sunday night. jabs at academy's lack of racial diversity were expected from the moment the nominations were announced when it was revealed that all 20 nominated actors were white. >> you realize if they nominated hosts i wouldn't even get this job. rock kept the jokes coming, even out of the commercial break. >> oh, we're black. >> the broadcast politically charged atmosphere included more than just diversity issue. dim. caprio took home the oscar for best actor and took the opportunity to deliver a message about the environment. a passion of his more than a decade. >> climate change is real. is happening right now. is the most urgent threat cing our entire species. i'm the least qualified man re tonight. ank you. vice president joe biden lked on stage to a standing ation and talked of speaking out against sexual abuse. >> let's change the culture. part of his introduction to lady
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you." till it happens to you you won't know how i feel >> reporter: as the song ended victims of abuse filled the stage. the owe motion -- the emotional response from the audience was clear. brie larson hugged each person as they came off stage. >> and the oscar goes to -- >> "spotlight." >> reporter: the top honor went to a film with the strongest political message. spotlight tells the true story of journalists at the "boston globe" who investigated the catholic church's cover-up of molestation by the city's priests. >> this film gave a voice to survivors. and this oscar amplifies that voice which we hope will become a choir that will resonate all right way to the vatican. >> reporter: the first time a director won back to back oscars
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the biggest upset. a bridge of spies, not sylvester stallone won best supporting actor. best supporting actress, alicia vikander. mad max fury road, six oscars. real star of the show was chris rock. felt he hit it out of the ballpark. at the museum of modern art in new york city, film technicians earned an oscar of their own. they find and preserve classic films some 100 years old. anthony mason reports. >> reporter: the film archives of the museum of modern art curators are trying to restore a silent film classic. >> if you look closely you can't see it now. but you can see it is very scratched. >> reporter: the 1923 film, "rosita" stars mary pickford, one
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>> this is the only surviving complete print of the film. >> yes. >> katie trainer manages the collection. >> this print was 4 k scanned at a lab. and now they're in the process of going through it like, moma's film archive is the oldest in the world. >> our little guy. >> reporter: so influential. in 1977, the academy honored the museum for pioneering work. >> this is our oscar. >> nice. >> museum of modern art, department of film. >> specifically for our work in film preservation. >> raj roy says as moma's library expanded it outgrew the museum's new york city location. this sprawling storage facility was built in hamlin, pennsylvania. >> cold in here. >> very cold, yeah, all the better to keep these. at this temperature, 35 degrees. relatively dry. we can keep these almost 400 years. >> reporter: this is just one of more than 50 storage vaults.
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everything from experimental films to classics like "birth of a nation" and "grapes of wrath" and "the third man." >> a film called citizen kane on any many reels. keep them flat. dry. cold. having the analog storage version. the best thing. lets me sleep at night. knowing we have this. >> old posters? >> posters, ephemera. record from distributors, studios. >> moma also archives those. >> these are all from the atlanta premiere of gone with the wind. >> reporter: like the studio scrapbook of press clippings from "gone with the wind's" 1939 premiere which includes a page on the black actors in the film. awe moma's work of restoring "rosita" in all will take two
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it will bring back a major mary pickford film also the first am director, ernst lubich. head of film preservation at moma. >> how does the film like that disappear? >> mary apparently took a personal dislike to it. for reasons that are still not completely clear. it seems she deliberately allowed the film to deteriorate. didn't renew the copy right on the film. >> the museum discovered a copy in the soviet union in the 1970s. >> in horrible condition. just too much for the technology of the time to handle. >> reporter: now rosita's time has the finally come. and kerr wishes more films could be restored to the quality of douglas fairbank's final movie, "the iron mask" made in 1929. >> this is a copy made directly from the original camera negative. actual film passed through the
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>> reporter: even showing the films will become challenging. 35 millimeter projectors are no longer manufactured. and spare parts will keep projectors going only for another decade. >> but after that. we have to start digitizing this massive collection, a huge understaking. make is my head explode. >> you feel like you are in a race? >> it is getting there. don't think the seriousness of this has settled in, even in the archival. >> movies are what america did best in the 20th century. that's our defining art form.
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yesterday was leap day. if you missed it you are not alone. february 29th comes around one every four years. most of the time. jamie wax has the confusing story of the extra day. >> every four years we have to squeez an extra day into february. except we don't add an extra day every four years if that year is evenly divisible by 100 and also divisible by 400. if that sound confusing, it is. we decided to dig into what leap years are all about. started with one special leap day birthday girl.
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sun day's finest for her birthday party this weekend. >> isn't she beautiful? >> she was born on february 29, 1916, making her america's oldest living leap baby. >> amazing. >> you made it. >> yeah. >> reporter: the bash complete with an 80-piece marching band was celebration of her 100 years. according to the calendar her 25th birthday. daisy seemed to embrace the latter. why does daisy's birthday only come around once every four years? do you know why we have a leap year? >> no. >> no. >> probably something about the sun. >> the seasons and, global warming. >> i don't know. >> el nino. >> reporter: we decided might be best to consult an expert. theoretical physicist. why do we need a leap year?
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humor. did not make a calendar when you go around the sun in 3465 days. what we learn in school. no, mother nature made it so every 365 days plus 5:49 and few odd seconds. that means that every year we have to compensate for one quarter of a day. after four years we have to add one more day. so when did we figure out the need for this extra day it? was bay back in 46 bc. julius caesar realized the calendar wasn't working. consulted with an astronomer. they realized what the egyptians had already discovered. we need an extra day every four years to stay on track. so he instituted the julian calendar. even that wasn't quite right. the solar year is .242 longer,
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when we add a full day every four years we are left with surplus of 11 minutes every year. that can start to add up. finally in 1582, pope gregory 17th. instituted the gregorian calendar we follow today. how is it different? i will let michio kaku explain. >> 11 minutes difference in one year, builds up. the pope had to intervene the calendar one more time. so for example in the year 1600. divisible by 400. a leap year. in 1700. 1800. 1900. no leap year. year 2000 there was again a leap year. >> lot of tweaking. >> that's right. >> luck we he have digital watches to keep track. it turns out, accounting for leap years is difficult for
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>> this watch has a wheel that turns one revolution every four years to accommodate the extra day. >> some body engineer a wheel. that turns once every four years? >> many of us have to adjust the gauges, end of february. protect the leap, perpetual calendar does that for you. >> to see how it works. we looked at one under a microscope. >> it is a cycle of 48 months for the leap year. we have a 48. 48 lobes. each lobe represents a month. >> reporter: it take is a year and a half to construct one watch. it will set you back around $85,000. you have four years to save up for the next leap year. around the world, leap year traditions vary. in greece, it's bad luck to get married any day of the leap year. up north. february 29th. the own day a woman can propose
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for daisy, her birthday tradition has always been a nice dinner with family and friend. but this year was different. after all, it's not every day you turn 25. one last thing to think about this leap year morning. if you've haven't left for work. consider just saying home. if you are a salaried employee your company is getting an extra day of work from you this year, for free. when the engines failed on the plane i was flying, i knew what to do to save my passengers.
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i didn't know how to help him. when he ultimately shot himself, he left our family devastated. don't let this happen to you. if you or a loved one is suicidal, call the national suicide prevention lifeline. no matter how hopeless or helpless you feel, with the right help, you can get well. (franklin d. roosevelt) the inherent right to work is one of the elemental privileges of a free people. endowed, as our nation is, with abundant physical resources... ...and inspired as it should be to make those resources and opportunities available for the enjoyment of all... ...we approach reemployment with real hope of finding a better answer than we have now. narrator: donate to goodwill where your donations help fund
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of its driverless cars. last month in mountain view. a driverless lexus tried to maneuver sandbags and side swiped a bus when it reentered its lane. no one was hurt. damage was minimal. peter greenberg got a look at the state of the technology. >> reporter: to see where driver's cars are heading.
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professor raj kumara at carnegie melon university. where the technology was created over 30 years age for all the people telling us we are going to be driving, driverless car tomorrow, you say? >> just wait. the magic all happens in here. >> reporter: right. keep waiting. because despite all the technology and decades of research, the driverless car has a long way to go. >> the biggest nightmare that people like me who work on the car is that somebody deploys this technology prematurely and it causes an accident and some child dies. >> reporter: as disturbing as unlikely, a scenario on the mind of researchers and slowing momentum of autonomous vehicles. >> we as human beings are much less tolerant of an error a machine makes. >> gill pratt heads the research institute. global initiative from the manufacture the driverless car. >> how do you program decisions into the driverless car? >> what you are really talking
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is called planning. planning for near infinite number of ethical scenarios like this. suppose your car is approaching a head-on collision. to avoid the vehicle, your car can move right because crossing the yellow line on the left is illegal. what is there is a person. group of people to your ght? these machines have ability understand what is happening the world much better than a man can. every time? the leading tow yo ta search at mit. whatever time it is asonable. lf driving can be used to day. d used at low speeds perhaps ere we don't about whether ere is catastrophic collision. >> back on the road oot carnegie
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a detour. it's tuesday, march 1st, 2016. this is the cbs morning news. >> super tuesday. millions of americans will vote today and determine the future
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>> i was doing -- >> tearful testimony. she tries to win a $75 million lawsuit over a nude video secretly shot while she was in a hotel room. fender bender. for the first time, one of google's self-driving cars causes an accident. why the tech giant says it's only partly to blame. and storm survivor. a fedex driver lives to tell how she lived through a tornado that leveled a hardware store. "sportsbeat" "sportsbeat" ing. >> good morning. good to be with you. i'm anne-marie green. it is super tuesday, arguably the most important day of the presidential primary season. more delegates are up for grabs today than any other single day of the contest.

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